Narthur's Microblog

Commonplace book - Wikipedia - “Commonplace books (or commonplaces) are a way to compile knowledge, usually by writing information into books. They have been kept from antiquity, and were kept particularly during the Renaissance and in the nineteenth century. Such books are essentially scrapbooks filled with items of every kind: recipes, quotes, letters, poems, tables of weights and measures, proverbs, prayers, legal formulas. Commonplaces are used by readers, writers, students, and scholars as an aid for remembering useful concepts or facts. Each one is unique to its creator’s particular interests but they almost always include passages found in other texts, sometimes accompanied by the compiler’s responses. They became significant in Early Modern Europe.”

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Maker’s Schedule, Manager’s Schedule - “There are two types of schedule, which I’ll call the manager’s schedule and the maker’s schedule.”

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100 time, energy, and attention hacks to be more productive #article - “Toward the end of my year of productivity, I realized that every single article I wrote for A Year of Productivity could be classified into one (or more) of three categories: how to better manage your time, how to better manage your energy , and how to better manage your attention.”

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How to Boost Productivity Through Building Momentum #article - “Momentum has a profound effect on willpower and productivity. Negative momentum can hurt your productivity tremendously and positive momentum can help your productivity tremendously. This article will describe how to stop negative momentum, how to build positive momentum, and how to sustain it.”

Morning Momentum: The #1 Factor That Makes Or Breaks My Productivity #article - “Of all the things that can boost emotions, motivation, and perceptions during a workday, the single most important is making progress in meaningful work. And: The more frequently people experience that sense of progress, the more likely they are to be creatively productive in the long run.”

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The Focus Toolkit - Thomas Frank - “Need to focus? Here’s a toolbox full of resources that will help you do it successfully.”

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The PARA Method: A Universal System for Organizing Digital Information #article - “Imagine for a moment the perfect organizational system. One that supported and enhanced the work you do, telling you exactly where to put a piece of information, and exactly where to find it when you needed it.”

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I don’t know what the comment policy is on your microblog, but both @dehowell and I have taken classes from Tiago. I really liked Building a Second Brain.

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This is really interesting and very timely for me. One of my tasks that I’m working on for Proj240 is to put GTD into full effect, and this issue has kind of been a stumbling block for me:

One thing that annoys me is that Tiago doesn’t give any credit to David Allen or his book and system Getting Things Done, when this PARA system is in large part based on GTD - you could even see it as a summary or reformulation of GTD. A lot of the ideas in that essay are taken directly from GTD, even in almost the same language, to the point where I would consider large parts of that link to be plagiarism.

There are also parts that could also be seen as a refinement of GTD regarding projects vs areas of responsibility.

The marketing also strikes me as very sleazy, so I will not be giving this guy my email address or any money.

But in any case, reading this link and thinking about this distinction was incredibly helpful for me - this is exactly what was tripping me up in terms of implementing GTD.

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All comments welcome! :smiley:

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I’m also allergic to this kind of “pay to read my content” framework. I enjoyed the article, but left his site the second I hit the paywall.

Wow. I really liked Tiago’s article, but had no idea about this. Added to the marketing sleaze, that drops him off my useful-source-of-info radar. A shame.

(@narthur, thanks all the same for the link! I loved reading this article.)

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I don’t know… To play devil’s advocate, if someone makes great content, I don’t really have a problem with them charging for it. And, to be fair, the PARA model has become basically ubiquitous at this point, and I’m not convinced it didn’t predate GTD, though I don’t have proof either way.

Yikes! That is a big miss. This post really should have explicitly cited GTD. I’m not defending the lack of citation, but I want to speak on Tiago’s behalf more generally. In several other contexts, I’ve seen him give credit to David Allen (definitely in the Building a Second Brain course material) and he often explicitly pitches PARA as some guidance on how to implement the “reference system” component of GTD. So he is not generally trying to take credit for Allen’s ideas, even if it seemed that way from this post.

I’m not trying to talk anyone out of their feelings about paywalled content or Tiago’s marketing style, but Building a Second Brain was incredibly valuable for me. I took the class in 2017 and have been using the methods since then. PARA is just one part of the overall system. BASB really does go well above-and-beyond stock GTD and has made a huge difference in how much value I get out of my notes and reading.

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Seconding dehowell. Tiago does talk about David Allen and GTD explicitly by name all the time, so I promise he is not trying to wholesale plagiarise, but that doesn’t mean that any one article couldn’t be clearer.

He would love the feedback about the article, I promise!

The value of his thinking and ideas has outweighed the slightly-offputting marketing polish, for me.

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